Growing Up Wonder Dog

Music Percy likes: Brown Bird, Mumford and Sons

Music Percy doesn’t like: Any dubstep ever

Music Percy likes: Brown Bird, Mumford and Sons

Music Percy doesn’t like: Any dubstep ever

posted 4 hours ago with 2 notes

ibrake4chihuahuas:

Service dogs❤️

ibrake4chihuahuas:

Service dogs❤️


farfromequatorial:

Even if aversive training was the most effective method, even if there were no negative consequences, even if it was easier…positive reinforcement works too.

And if you love your dog, why wouldn’t you pick the training method that doesn’t cause any pain, stress, or suffering?

That’s what I don’t understand.


dvoted:

i hope i get accepted into illini service dogs /:

Oooo, they’re an excellent program, good luck! (: 

posted 2 days ago via dvoted with 2 notes

thinblend asked: "how would someone get started in dog sports? what are the requirements, if any?"

merlinthecollie:

jocks-on-4-paws:

Oops. This question kind of got away on me. I think I’ve written essays shorter than this.

In general, I’d start contacting teams and dog clubs and start taking classes. You can also go to trials/tournaments around you and just talk to the people. At the last disc trial I was at, some lady came to talk because she was driving past and saw a dog event going on. She ended up buying some discs and getting contact information to start playing with her dogs. Although fair warning, if you have a height dog and try this at a flyball tournament, you might get mobbed by different teams.

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Is there anything you can start working on with agility by yourself? Merlin is still too young (in my mind) at 9 months to be doing too much. Also so far I have found no agility classes near me. We work on normal obedience skills and do fun tricks. We’re going to be starting to work on rally here shortly.

Although it’s a long shot since you have no classes near you, have you checked dog parks? I honestly have no idea how common it is to have agility in dog parks, but here we have a private one & a public one with equipment. I’d say jumps are probably out of the question, but he could do pretty much everything else - tunnels, chutes, a-frames, seesaws, etc. You can buy some stuff pretty easily online, and other stuff you can make (ex weave poles) or find (ex seesaws).

Have you tried asking other trainers in the area about agility classes? They usually know about the other trainers in the area and could point you somewhere, or they may have been debating an agility class already but haven’t listed it anywhere.


obligatesandopportunists:

Ugh I’m so excited man. I start fostering for the service dog organization this weekend, finally! I’ve been dying to pupsit since I started volunteering with them last year, but wasn’t able to since I lived on campus.

The home visit went well and after talking to my vet, they were happy to accept Susie’s titers in place of ‘up-to-date’ vaccinations. Awesome.

I’ll be fostering a service dog in training, Cole, on the weekends. He’s a yellow lab pup and I’m so excited!!!! I even get him three days this weekend because it’s Labor Day weekend, hehe.

An unanticipated benefit: hopefully this’ll help somewhat to keep puppy fever at bay. At best I would be able to get a puppy early summer, but that’s entirely dependent on my housing next year, which is sort of up in the air right now, so it’s entirely possible I won’t be able to have any new additions for quite some time. Which is perfectly fine, although certainly disappointing.

Yesterday was the student organization fair on campus and we did so well. We got a ton of interest, and it didn’t hurt that we also had two pups with us. Our goal for this semester is to have at least 50 members who have paid dues, and we got at least 250 names and emails from people interested in joining. Hopefully most of them show up to our first meeting!!

Omg you’re going to have so much fun!! (:

It makes me so happy to see all these service dog organizations spring up on college campuses, it’s such an amazing opportunity for students.


thesecretlifeofachristianwitch asked: "Hi! Lexiconofoberon said you might be able to tell me about what having a service dog in an educational setting is like. What were students'/teachers'/administration's reactions to it? What about students with allergies or fears of dogs? When are you allowed to take your dog out for a bathroom break? That sort of stuff. Thank for taking the time to read this!"

I’ll post this publicly, since it’s “that time of year” and others may have questions, plus I believe I’ve got a few followers who also have their dogs in school.

If my teachers posted syllabi ahead of time, I would email them and tell them about the dog - however, this literally only happened twice. Both times though, the professors were fine with it. If they didn’t post syllabi, I’d try to get to class early and tell them about Bruce. For an actual service dog, I would highly recommend getting in touch with your teachers before hand especially if your disability is invisible. Professors mean well (really honestly they do), but they may assume you are training the dog and say something about it in class.

Students are going to be your biggest problem, both with trying to get close and trying to get away. Practice saying no if you need to - seriously, like get someone to attempt to drive-by pet! Drive-bys will happen, 100% fact, I would bet money on it. Don’t be offended if someone gets afraid of your dog - you don’t sound like you’re at a university, but when you get there, some people are raised with different cultural views of dogs and it’s just something you/we have to live around. Just try to sit (or be seated) as far away as possible. I like to sit on aisle rows, in the back and/or near the doors. 

As for bathroom breaks, I’ve only ever had a dog in a college setting, so I’m out of class every 50 minutes to an hour and a half. Sorry. :/

I’ve heard/read stories of dogs in K-12 settings, and typically the teachers are up for it, it’s administration that would be likely to put up a fight. Not very common, but be prepared with the laws and what not (there are different laws governing school settings). Ask to sit near the door in case anything were to happen (about to vomit/void, goes crazy) you can escape quickly. When I hear of dogs in K-12 settings (whether in training or working), typically the person sets up a certain time to go outside for potty breaks between classes - asking one teacher for permission to leave a bit early, asking the next if you can be a bit late. Make sense? 

In my experience, it’s significantly nicer to have them in a school setting rather than a work setting - maybe not for them, but for us. It may take some getting used to for your pup, as not being allowed to do anything for several hours a day is boring, but if they’re already service dog material they can adapt. If you’ve never asked them to lay still for such an extended length of time, you can start preparing at home plus try to be prepared with treats when you go to classes - maybe even try to find a buddy to get notes from if you miss anything because of training issues.

posted 5 days ago with 2 notes

It’s so grossly hot outside and it makes everyone sad.

It’s so grossly hot outside and it makes everyone sad.

posted 6 days ago with 5 notes

Barkbooxxxxx! It’s nautical themed and pretty much the cutest. I’m a sucker for themes.

From the last box: the bully stick went fast and Sherlock loved it, the Indigo chews can stain but they were a big hit with Percy and Sherlock (and lasted a looong time to boot), and the jerky treats are absolutely fabulous! They’re like my favourite Zukes Filet treats but in a jerky form. As for the shark toy, the boys are playing with it right now so they obviously love it. The fur on the back I’m not so keen on but no one has tried to chew it off yet.

Barkbooxxxxx! It’s nautical themed and pretty much the cutest. I’m a sucker for themes.

From the last box: the bully stick went fast and Sherlock loved it, the Indigo chews can stain but they were a big hit with Percy and Sherlock (and lasted a looong time to boot), and the jerky treats are absolutely fabulous! They’re like my favourite Zukes Filet treats but in a jerky form. As for the shark toy, the boys are playing with it right now so they obviously love it. The fur on the back I’m not so keen on but no one has tried to chew it off yet.

posted 6 days ago with 3 notes

"I’ve had dogs for x years, I know what I’m doing"

No, the length of time you’ve owned dogs means nothing to me. I have significantly more respect for the kids who raise service dogs for just a year than I do for people who think “the way I’ve always done it” is a good enough reason for something.

posted 6 days ago with 25 notes

life-with-kate-and-dogs
Haha, I’d take your treats! #dogtrainerlife
I think, I’m not super sure, but I think there’s a similar subscription service where you can pick what you want each month. You may be able to get an only toys kind of thing that way, although I’ve only skimmed the website once and can’t even remember what it’s called.

life-with-kate-and-dogs

Haha, I’d take your treats! #dogtrainerlife

I think, I’m not super sure, but I think there’s a similar subscription service where you can pick what you want each month. You may be able to get an only toys kind of thing that way, although I’ve only skimmed the website once and can’t even remember what it’s called.

posted 6 days ago with 2 notes

Barkbooxxxxx! It’s nautical themed and pretty much the cutest. I’m a sucker for themes.

From the last box: the bully stick went fast and Sherlock loved it, the Indigo chews can stain but they were a big hit with Percy and Sherlock (and lasted a looong time to boot), and the jerky treats are absolutely fabulous! They’re like my favourite Zukes Filet treats but in a jerky form. As for the shark toy, the boys are playing with it right now so they obviously love it. The fur on the back I’m not so keen on but no one has tried to chew it off yet.

Barkbooxxxxx! It’s nautical themed and pretty much the cutest. I’m a sucker for themes.

From the last box: the bully stick went fast and Sherlock loved it, the Indigo chews can stain but they were a big hit with Percy and Sherlock (and lasted a looong time to boot), and the jerky treats are absolutely fabulous! They’re like my favourite Zukes Filet treats but in a jerky form. As for the shark toy, the boys are playing with it right now so they obviously love it. The fur on the back I’m not so keen on but no one has tried to chew it off yet.

posted 6 days ago with 3 notes

equestrienne-love asked: "So I have a question that I thought you might be able to help me with. Are 'emotional support' dogs real service dogs? I was at a museum yesterday and I saw a lady who had a husky with her wearing a vest that said in one place in very small letters 'emotional support dog'. Now, I'm not one to judge and I may be wrong but I did not think that those were a real thing. Having a pet that 'helps you emotionally' is not the same as having a real service animal that is specially trained to help you"

ziggyit:

growingupwonderdog:

varying on your disability. They are specially trained, certified, and legal. I understand that many disabilities are not ‘visible’ (ex. diabetes, PTSD, etc). so I can’t say that just because she didn’t seem to have any disability that she didn’t, but her dog didn’t seem like a service dog- you can buy a fake service dog vest and certification online. Maybe I’m a rambling idiot who has no idea what I’m talking about (and that is likely) but I honestly did not think that they were the real deal.

I’m probably wrong, haha! I know there are service dogs for so many different things, including many mental disabilities. And it’s amazing! I just was curious and thought that maybe you could help me out. :) Thanks!

You are correct! Emotional support animals are a whole different category - people often confuse service dogs, therapy dogs, and emotional support dogs, but they are not even close to the same thing. Therapy dogs (and other animals) work with many people to provide emotional comfort, usually visiting places like hospitals, orphanages, foster homes, retirement homes, schools, stuff like that - they have no special laws regarding access, and are only allowed in these places with permission. Emotional support dogs work with one person (or possibly multiple people in one household) to provide emotional comfort only at home, and have laws that they are allowed in no-pet housing & in the cabin of airplanes, but have no public access allowance like service dogs do. Then there’s service dogs (or, assistance dogs) which, as you may already know, are allowed anywhere the public is allowed with their (disabled) handler but must also perform at least one task to mitigate the disability which does not include “existing”, haha. Psychological service dogs still must perform some task to help their handler, such as grounding, deep pressure therapy, blocking, or room searching.

If you see someone whose dog has a vest saying “emotional support animal”, you could try (very politely) educating them, as the person may not know the laws but may still have a disability. Otherwise, if the dog is acting out of control and the handler does nothing to prevent the behaviours, you can inform a manager of the laws - specifically, the one that says he can legally kick them out for being disruptive. 

Just hopping in to say the OP says real service dogs are certified - that’s not true!

While there are some sites where you can get your dog “certified”, these are scams and have no legal power. The ADA doesn’t require or acknowledge any certification.

Now there are tests you can run your dog through to show that they’ve got good public access skills, like the Canine Good Citizen test, but they are neither required nor going to give you some sort of get out of jail free card if you’re challenged.

Oops, good catch! (: Yep, there is no legally required certification for service dogs, but some organizations give out “certifications” or IDs anyway - so certifications that say an organization on them (IE Canine Companions for Independence, Power Paws Assistance Dogs) would be legit but have little purpose, certifications that say registry on them (IE National Service Dog Registry, United States Service Dog Registry) mean absolutely nothing.


equestrienne-love asked: "So I have a question that I thought you might be able to help me with. Are 'emotional support' dogs real service dogs? I was at a museum yesterday and I saw a lady who had a husky with her wearing a vest that said in one place in very small letters 'emotional support dog'. Now, I'm not one to judge and I may be wrong but I did not think that those were a real thing. Having a pet that 'helps you emotionally' is not the same as having a real service animal that is specially trained to help you"

varying on your disability. They are specially trained, certified, and legal. I understand that many disabilities are not ‘visible’ (ex. diabetes, PTSD, etc). so I can’t say that just because she didn’t seem to have any disability that she didn’t, but her dog didn’t seem like a service dog- you can buy a fake service dog vest and certification online. Maybe I’m a rambling idiot who has no idea what I’m talking about (and that is likely) but I honestly did not think that they were the real deal.

I’m probably wrong, haha! I know there are service dogs for so many different things, including many mental disabilities. And it’s amazing! I just was curious and thought that maybe you could help me out. :) Thanks!

You are correct! Emotional support animals are a whole different category - people often confuse service dogs, therapy dogs, and emotional support dogs, but they are not even close to the same thing. Therapy dogs (and other animals) work with many people to provide emotional comfort, usually visiting places like hospitals, orphanages, foster homes, retirement homes, schools, stuff like that - they have no special laws regarding access, and are only allowed in these places with permission. Emotional support dogs work with one person (or possibly multiple people in one household) to provide emotional comfort only at home, and have laws that they are allowed in no-pet housing & in the cabin of airplanes, but have no public access allowance like service dogs do. Then there’s service dogs (or, assistance dogs) which, as you may already know, are allowed anywhere the public is allowed with their (disabled) handler but must also perform at least one task to mitigate the disability which does not include “existing”, haha. Psychological service dogs still must perform some task to help their handler, such as grounding, deep pressure therapy, blocking, or room searching.

If you see someone whose dog has a vest saying “emotional support animal”, you could try (very politely) educating them, as the person may not know the laws but may still have a disability. Otherwise, if the dog is acting out of control and the handler does nothing to prevent the behaviours, you can inform a manager of the laws - specifically, the one that says he can legally kick them out for being disruptive. 

posted 6 days ago with 6 notes

just-ask-marco:

//anyone know how one can acquire a PTSD dog/service animal

(Send me a link or explain)

It’s a long story but my family feels I may Benefit in the long run with one

I’m on mobile currently, but I have a long list of SD orgs on my blog, and it’s coded by type the org trains. It is very common to owner train a PSD as well.